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Thread: FPV Safety Guidelines

  1. #21
    GO HAWKS Hucker's Avatar
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    How about :

    Follow applicable FCC regulations for your radio gear.


    I could understand how you might say, they should be doing that anyway so we shouldn't need to say it, but the fact is that we are using the amateur HAM bands that radio amateurs have fought to keep for many years. I assure you that they do not like knowing that a ton of people are using the bands without license. I think it is show of respect to them that we realize that we are also in their airspace and as well as FS aviation airspace.

  2. #22
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    Commercial operations (e.g.: pay-for-hire, aerial photography, etc)

    I fully understand what you mean here, but aerial photography is not a pure example of a commercial operation, it's only conditionally, if money is received for anything produced between takeoff and landing (including an "fpv tour of the area" as a service).
    I'd probably also state that commercial activities are covered by strict governmental laws instead, so that new people picking up these rules do not assume commercial activities are subject to no guidelines whatsoever.

    My suggestion is to change this to something more or less like this, but some tweaking may be required to keep it simple:

    Commercial operations (i.e: where you receive money for activities undertaken between takeoff and landing) are not recreational activities and are instead covered by governmental law in your country.

  3. #23
    Navigator scrtsqrl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by radialmind View Post
    Commercial operations (e.g.: pay-for-hire, aerial photography, etc)

    I fully understand what you mean here, but aerial photography is not a pure example of a commercial operation, it's only conditionally, if money is received for anything produced between takeoff and landing (including an "fpv tour of the area" as a service).
    I'd probably also state that commercial activities are covered by strict governmental laws instead, so that new people picking up these rules do not assume commercial activities are subject to no guidelines whatsoever.

    My suggestion is to change this to something more or less like this, but some tweaking may be required to keep it simple:

    Commercial operations (i.e: where you receive money for activities undertaken between takeoff and landing) are not recreational activities and are instead covered by governmental law in your country.
    Edited. Thanks for the input.
    Below average guy doing average work

  4. #24
    I Drink to Forget PDXDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by radialmind View Post
    Commercial operations (e.g.: pay-for-hire, aerial photography, etc)

    I fully understand what you mean here, but aerial photography is not a pure example of a commercial operation, it's only conditionally, if money is received for anything produced between takeoff and landing (including an "fpv tour of the area" as a service).
    I'd probably also state that commercial activities are covered by strict governmental laws instead, so that new people picking up these rules do not assume commercial activities are subject to no guidelines whatsoever.

    My suggestion is to change this to something more or less like this, but some tweaking may be required to keep it simple:

    Commercial operations (i.e: where you receive money for activities undertaken between takeoff and landing) are not recreational activities and are instead covered by governmental law in your country.
    Maybe I'm overthinking things a bit (wouldn't be the first time), but this made me flash back to my days as an airline pilot. The FAA uses the term "operating for compensation or hire," and interprets "compensation" very broadly. Money does not need to change hands. For instance, there are circumstances in which a private pilot could take a flight for someone else in all innocence. But if the destination is not of his own choosing, and if he is using the flight to build his flight hours towards a commercial certificate, the FAA sees that as the pilot as having received compensation and therefore conducting a commercial operation. FAR 1.1 includes this definition: "Where it is doubtful that an operation is for “compensation or hire”, the test applied is whether the carriage by air is merely incidental to the person's other business or is, in itself, a major enterprise for profit."

    I've been trying to find out how the UAPO defines a "commercial operation" and haven't had any luck yet. Maybe in the interim we should change "money" to "compensation" in this definition. Thoughts?

  5. #25
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    My input:

    3. If flying outside of the AMA field, the following rules apply:
    a. Have a safety observer to clear your airspace, providing warning as required.

    If I'm my own "safety observer" how can that be phrased so there is no legal challenge to the definition of "safety observer" interpreted rigidly as a being a different person than the operator?

    b. Your plane should stay in the airspace cleared by your safety observer. (That means not in or on the other side of clouds.)

    Merge 3a. and 3b. to define in which class of space, as per FAA rules, can we fly, and also in which conditions of visibility, (which is basically separation distance from clouds in each class of airspace).

    c. Be familiar with your airspace. Avoid operations close to full scale aircraft, (airports, restricted areas, warning areas, military training routes, etc.) unless you have permission from the appropriate authorities (ATC, tower, airport manager, etc.).

  6. #26
    FPV Browncoat prelator's Avatar
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    This code looks pretty good, but I should post this here as well for consideration. This is a different safety code some of us came up with after some discussion in another thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy1 View Post

    FirstPerson Video/View (FPV) Aircraft Safety Code


    Effective June 1, 2012


    GENERAL: A First PersonVideo/View (FPV) model aircraft is an unmanned aircraft capable of sustained flight in the atmosphere. It is intended exclusively for sport, recreation and/or competition. All model flights should be conducted in accordance with this safety code and any additional rules specific to the flying site.


    1.FPV aircraft should not be flown:

    (a) In a careless or reckless manner.

    (b) At a location where model aircraft activities are prohibited.


    2.FPV aircraft pilots should:

    (a) Yield the right of way to all manned aircraft.

    (b) See and avoid all aircraft and a spotter should be used when appropriate (busy airspace, populated areas, long distance flights, etc.)

    (c) Not fly higher than approximately 400 feet above ground level within three (3)miles of an airport, or in Terminally Controlled Air Space (TCAS) without notifying the airport operator.

    (d) Not interfere with operations and traffic patterns at any airport, heliport or seaplane base except where there is a mixed use agreement.

    (e) Not operate FPV aircraft while under theinfluence of alcohol or while using any drug which could adversely affect thepilot’s ability to safely control the model.

    3.FPV Aircraft should:

    (a) Not exceed a takeoff weight including fuel, of 25 pounds for a FPV aircraft, or 10 pounds for a FPV aircraft flown in urban or heavily populated areas.

    (b) Be identified with the name and address of the owner on the inside or affixed to the outside of the model aircraft. (This does not apply to model aircraft flown indoors).

    (c) Not be equipped with metal-blade propellers.

    (d) Not carry pyrotechnic devices which explode or burn,or any device which propels a projectile or drops any object that creates a hazard to persons or property.

    Exceptions:

    Free Flight fuses or devices that burn producing smoke and are securely attached to the model aircraft during flight.

    Rocket motors (using solid propellant) up to a G-series size may be used provided they remain attached to the model during flight.

    Model rockets may be flown in accordance with the National Model Rocketry Safety Code.

    Pre-arranged and pre-authorized events agreed upon in writing with the event organizer.


    4. FPV RADIOCONTROL (RC)

    (a)All pilots should avoid flying directly over open air assemblies of people, unprotectedvessels, vehicles or open structures (i.e. stadiums or stands with people inthem) and shall avoid endangerment of life and property of others.

    (b)A successful radio equipment ground-range check in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations should be completed before the first flight of a new or repaired model aircraft.

    (c)FPV model aircraft must use the radio-control frequencies currently allowed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Only individuals properly licensedby the FCC are authorized to operate equipment on Amateur Band frequencies. (HAM license required except for certain frequencies have low power options that do not require licensing per FCC Part 15- i.e. 910 MHz @ approximately 0.025W)

    (d)Excluding takeoff and landing, no FPV model should be flown outdoors closer than 25 feet to any individual.

    (e)FPV night flying aircraft should have a lighting system providing the pilot and others with a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times.
    One advantage of that code is that a spotter is not absolutely required. That I think is critical for many of us who fly alone the vast majority of the time and simply don't have the option to use a spotter very often. A possible compromise would be to only require a spotter if flying above 400 feet, since theoretically unless you're right in front of an airport runway there should be no airspace conflicts at that altitude.
    ~Patrick M.

    YouTube Channel: youtube.com/user/SerithianFPV

    Colorado FPV Pilot and Flying Site Map: mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zjYlxx5w300I.kmgDGKOhrMAo

  7. #27
    Navigator scrtsqrl's Avatar
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    Changes made. Pls review. Thanks for the input.
    Below average guy doing average work

  8. #28
    GO HAWKS Hucker's Avatar
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    scrtsqrl: Sorry for my post that appears to correct you after said you made a change. I had my post in the editor for a while and you responded before I finished. I like your wording better. Code is looking good.

  9. #29
    One with the machine FPV FLYER's Avatar
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    I don't think this is necessary: "Have a safety observer to clear your airspace, providing warning as required.", at this time we are trying to have the spotter removed with the ama.

    I just noticed it was removed, good.
    Last edited by FPV FLYER; 13th June 2012 at 11:18 PM.
    ONE WITH THE MACHINE --> https://www.youtube.com/FPVFLYER

  10. #30
    GO HAWKS Hucker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steamburn View Post
    My input:

    3. If flying outside of the AMA field, the following rules apply:
    a. Have a safety observer to clear your airspace, providing warning as required.

    If I'm my own "safety observer" how can that be phrased so there is no legal challenge to the definition of "safety observer" interpreted rigidly as a being a different person than the operator?

    b. Your plane should stay in the airspace cleared by your safety observer. (That means not in or on the other side of clouds.)

    Merge 3a. and 3b. to define in which class of space, as per FAA rules, can we fly, and also in which conditions of visibility, (which is basically separation distance from clouds in each class of airspace).

    c. Be familiar with your airspace. Avoid operations close to full scale aircraft, (airports, restricted areas, warning areas, military training routes, etc.) unless you have permission from the appropriate authorities (ATC, tower, airport manager, etc.).
    I like the idea of being explicit on airspace e.g. your plane shall remain clear of B/C/D airspace.

    This forces FPV pilots that fly higher and farther to look at a sectional on line or ask for help on airspace. You can adde the restricted/prohibited too but staying out of B/C/D is very important.

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