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Thread: Volantex Phoenix V2 759-2 2000mm Motor Glider - build log / review / mods (FPV!!!)

  1. #11
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    Nice review Mr A! I have been flying P2k's since they were Llanyu's They are a particularly nice flying cheapy. It's a pity they don't seem to be looking at these threads or they would have seen this criticism many years ago. With regard to setting the motor brake. If I remember correctly I used this to set the brake on my P2k v1 and ASW28, they appear to be the same ESC's as this one. From Ratter 1 on the RCGroups thread...

    "This is from the SA hobby shop Hobbymania as per their web page for the P2K/P2.6K

    Quote "Brake Function: By default, the ESC brake is "Off"

    Turning the Brake "On"

    1. Move the throttle stick to full throttle, turn on the transmitter and then connect the battery to the ESC.
    2. After 2 seconds the motor will have one beep sound, then the ESC will be in the Programming Mode.
    3. When you hear 3 continuous beeps, it's the the brake function setup.
    The 3 beeps will sound 4 times, during which time, you need to move the throttle stick to the off position. The ESC will beep once to confirm the change of the setting.
    4. Unplug the battery from the ESC.

    To turn the brake "Off"

    Repeat the above process.

    NOTE: If you miss the cycle of beeps, unplug the ESC and try again. DO NOT move the throttle stick, as you will put the ESC into "Engineering Mode". Just Unplug the ESC and start again.

    Confirm Brake Operation:


    Brake "On": Run the motor and then pull the throttle stick to the off position. The motor should stop immediately.

    Brake "Off": Run the motor and then pull the throttle stick to the off position. The motor should spin down slowly."
    Last edited by Heppy Ket; 15th August 2018 at 08:43 PM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heppy Ket View Post
    Nice review Mr A! I have been flying P2k's since they were Llanyu's They are a particularly nice flying cheapy. It's a pity they don't seem to be looking at these threads or they would have seen this criticism many years ago. With regard to setting the motor brake. If I remember correctly I used this to set the brake on my P2k v1 and ASW28, they appear to be the same ESC's as this one. From Ratter 1 on the RCGroups thread...

    "This is from the SA hobby shop Hobbymania as per their web page for the P2K/P2.6K

    Quote "Brake Function: By default, the ESC brake is "Off"

    Turning the Brake "On"

    1. Move the throttle stick to full throttle, turn on the transmitter and then connect the battery to the ESC.
    2. After 2 seconds the motor will have one beep sound, then the ESC will be in the Programming Mode.
    3. When you hear 3 continuous beeps, it's the the brake function setup.
    The 3 beeps will sound 4 times, during which time, you need to move the throttle stick to the off position. The ESC will beep once to confirm the change of the setting.
    4. Unplug the battery from the ESC.

    To turn the brake "Off"

    Repeat the above process.

    NOTE: If you miss the cycle of beeps, unplug the ESC and try again. DO NOT move the throttle stick, as you will put the ESC into "Engineering Mode". Just Unplug the ESC and start again.

    Confirm Brake Operation:


    Brake "On": Run the motor and then pull the throttle stick to the off position. The motor should stop immediately.

    Brake "Off": Run the motor and then pull the throttle stick to the off position. The motor should spin down slowly."
    What criticism exactly?

    I talk to them directly and do try to make them change things on the models, where possible, to address some of the issues! Getting them to put proper hinges on the control surfaces of these planes in the factory is one of my greatest wins over there! Hahahaha

  3. #13
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    UPDATE 2 - Omnibus F4 Pro with ArduPlane install, setup and maiden

    Alright, so I've finally given in and have decided to go ahead with the autopilot install on the Phoenix V2, although at the last moment I decided not to use the Micro APM, as I originally intended, but remembered I had an Omnibus F4 Pro board lying around, which is now also compatible with the ArduPlane code, and has two of the modules that would have otherwise been separate, power module and OSD, on-board, which will save a ton of wiring, work, and setting up to get them working together properly! I will also be using the RunCam Swift Micro camera and the AKK Nano 2 Vtx, just to keep things as light as possible.





    A Micro APM set of comparable abilities would weight at least 3-4 times more than this.





    If you are not sure how to install ArduPlane on the Omnibus F4 Pro board, I've made a quick tutorial to show you the steps, I do hope it would be helpful!





    My first job was to make a power harness for the servos, so they would be powered separately from the FC, just to keep their dirty power away from everything else.





    So, the way I go about this, is I take a 3 pin header, and and cut enough sections to fit the servos and to have a few extra, just in case.





    Next, I solder two of the rows along each row together, these will be the GND and positive to power the servos. The third row is left untouched, this is where the signal cables will go.





    Then I soldered the signal wires. Choose a length that would work for you and would allow you to more easily organise these things in the model.





    Next, since the Omnibus F4 Pro has standard servo pins for the signal cables, I crimped single servo connectors to the other end of the cables! If your flight controller has a different connector for the signal cables, solder that on to the end of these cables.





    Finally, I cover the power rows with hot glue to prevent any accidental shorts. The signal pin row is left about as untouched as possible, so I can add more wires in the future, if needed.





    I also took the chance to replace the stock Volantex ESC with a Turnigy K-force one, which is just a re-branded HobbyWing Platinum series ESC, so I used the HobbyWing program card to enable the brake option! The servo SBEC still connects here.





    Then, it was time to plug the servo connectors to the harness. Make sure you do not reverse the polarity on the SBEC when connecting it.





    I then soldered the servo pins to the Omnibus board.





    On the back side, I soldered the pads which will provide 5v to the video system, but as it turned, the voltage provided was something like 4.5v, which was not enough to power the camera, so I ended up powering the video system from the AKK PDB I also used on this build.





    Test fitting the hardness revealed that it works rather well.





    Next, in preparation for the power cables, I added the AKK PDB, which is identical to THIS Matek PDB I love and use on a lot of my builds.





    Then the power cables got soldered. The long one is for the battery, the short one goes to the ESC.





    Next it was time to test fit all of the electronics that were ready up to this point.





    Looks pretty good... only oversight on my part was the length of the servo signal cables for the harness. They were a bit short so I wasn't able to get them out of the way, and hence I had to raise them up in order to insert the battery below... but it still works OK.








    Continues in next post...

  4. #14
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    ... continued from previous post!


    The power cables were a good length for a change, and this look pretty clean here.





    At this point I also made a new cable for the micro telemetry module. These are great while setting up and tuning the model, but I rarely use them after that.





    The connector for it is the one at the back of the board, if you've oriented the board as suggested with the arrow pointing forward.





    A double-sided tape took care of mounting it on the fuselage.





    And then it was time to tackle the GPS install and placement. This is the GPS unit that was in my ZOHD Nano Talon, and since there it was connected to an Omnibus F3 Pro, the connector and wiring were directly compatible with the F4 Pro, so it was an easy install. I was going to be installing the Mini Pix with its own GPS on the Nano Talon, so it made sense to use this GPS on this plane.





    The connector for that is the one next to the servo signal pins.





    I used double-sided tape to mount it right above the flight controller on the inside of the fuselage.





    Finally, I took almost all of the stuff out of the plane for a final test fit, and also so I can figure out where and how to mount some of the last components.





    Also, took the chance to add power wires between the flight controller and the PDB board, so I can power the video system from it.





    I also soldered a wire to the RSSI pad on the Omnibus board, so I can connect it to the L9R's analogue RSSI output pin, and be able to monitor that on the OSD.





    Before putting the electronics back in there, I decided to replace the tail servos with metal geared ones... it is just going to make the wiring process so much easier. I am going to use Corona CS929MG metal geared servos, and while these two are brand new, the ones that will go on the wings will come from another model, which I am not longer flying. I can pretty much bet my life on these servos because they've been super reliable for me over the years, regardless I'd used the digital or analogue models.





    And now just a small sidetrack... when I removed the stock servos, I found this nice little knot tied around the servo extension connectors. The purpose of this thing is to keep the extension from disconnecting in flight, and it really surprised me because I really hadn't thought of this solution to this problem. Even though it is not the most compact way to secure these, it is simple and easy to do.





    But at the end... I did use proper servo extension locks!





    The servos fit perfectly in the stock servo slots at the tail.











    Next, it was the receiver's turn to get mounted. In order to keep it out of the way I decided to mount it right behind the wheel cover.





    It fit quite well in there, and thanks to SBUS, there are very few wires to run between it and the flight controller. I only with FrSky would update the firmware so we can also have RSSI on a channel, just like the XM+ receiver. This would make A LOT of people very happy!





    Continues in next post...

  5. #15
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    ... continued from previous post!


    And how it was time to also figure out the antennas! While one was left pointing straight back on the bottom of the fuselage, I needed to mount the other one vertical, so I can have some reception when it is out far. I have been able to get out to 22kms with this receiver, when it is mounted high above the fuselage, away from interference, so it would be interesting to see how it will fare in these conditions, when the antennas are so close to servo and video cables. I used double-sided tape to mount the antenna vertical on the inside of the wing mounting section of the fuselage.








    And last, before putting all of the electronics back in the plane, I pulled through the camera cables.





    Now, everything is mounted in the plane, and even though the wiring looks like a mess... it was still good. Only thing left to do was to finalise the video system wiring, and mount the camera and Vtx.














    For this build I decided not to put the FPV camera at the front of the plane, because that is plain boring now, and also because there is a motor and a prop there, and the latter will be always visible in the camera, unless I am gliding. Also, with that motor up there... really don't need more weight up front messing up the CG. Hence, I decided to mount the camera on top of the vertical stabiliser, where it would also give me an awesome video of the whole plane. To that end, I printed out a mount for the Swift Micro, and used longer bolts to secure the camera to the mount. I later also added a rubber band... just in case.





    It took a bit of work cutting out a precise opening for the mount, so the camera would be properly levelled and aligned, but I did get it right in the end.








    Used some glue to secure it in place, and it was a done deal.





    At first I had pulled the camera cable out of the back opening in the fuselage, but between a very tight fit with the rudder, and some sharp edges of the opening, I quickly dismissed this idea.





    Instead, I drilled a hole right near the end, and pulled the cable through there.





    Following, I routed it right on the leading edge of the vertical stab and used white tape to hold it in place. It actually turned out pretty clean looking!





    After thinking for a long time where to mount the Vtx... I decided that the easiest way to do it would be outside on the fuselage, with the antenna pointing downwards. Since it is a Nano Vtx... it could use the extra cooling. The hardest part for me was getting over the fact that something will be on the outside messing up the slick fuselage... but I had no other choice in this instance. I drilled a hole for the wiring to go through and proceeded with the install.





    I also really didn't want to extend the Vtx cables, so mounted it as far back as the stock cable would allow.





    Both camera and Vtx plug into the AKK PDB, with the Vtx using the 5v output, while the RunCam Swift Micro got connected to the 12v output.





    Continues in next post...

  6. #16
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    ... continued from previous post!


    Not the best looking install, but as soon as I added the white tape... things looked a bit better.








    And finally, it was time to replace the wing servos with the same Corona CS929MG servos that I installed in the tail. Because I didn't want a repeat of the EVE-2000 incident, I printed some of my servo holders to go into the wings before the servos.





    The stock servos were glued in pretty good, I did have to use a lot of force to take them out, but they are plastic nonetheless, and I am quite uncomfortable using plastic servos on something that weights more than 1kg and can reach high up into the sky.








    After the stock servos were removed, I would press the servo holder over the servo bed, so it would leave a mark in the foam. These are the bits that need to be cutout before the servo holder can be glued in.








    I used some of the glue that came with my Believer kit to mount the servo holders. It is clear and doesn't soften the foam around it while drying.





    And last, insert the servo and screw on the cover. This holder makes replacing the servos so much easier, and also keeps the servo clean from glue for later use.











    Alright, so with everything done now, the last thing I did was to find the new battery location that would give me the CG I needed, and I was ready to go flying!





    Here is the flight video, I hope you enjoy it, and stay tuned as I do hope to have more to show you of this plane in the not too distant future!



  7. #17
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    Nice job on all of this Arxangel!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shifteer View Post
    Nice job on all of this Arxangel!
    Thanks mate!

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