FPVLAB

image
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35

Thread: Money is no object: The ultimate build

  1. #1

    Money is no object: The ultimate build

    Howdy All, I'm new to FPV but familiar with complex projects, and to my wife's dismay, expensive hobbies One of the best questions that I've learned to ask when stating a new project (whether it's for work or play) is:

    If money were no object, how would you accomplish your goal?

    In this scenario, the goal is a complete FPV setup, including airframe, cameras, video Tx/Rx, GS...the whole kit.

    Many times the goal can be achieved within 95% of target using a small/moderate amount of money and effort. It might take a boatload more to reach the final 5% though. Of course goals are different for everyone, but this exercise is geared towards "typical" FPV adventures: Moderate distance, Maximum reliability and Maximum safety.

    Being new to this, I know to start small and add on as I go. However, knowing an end-goal can be really efective at keeping overall costs down. For example, buying a good camera the first time instead of buying 3 lousy ones THEN the good one.

    I'd really appreciate your input on the following, "If money was no object", AKA do it right the first time:

    • Airframe
    • Camera(s)
    • Batteries
    • Transmitters (both flight control and video)
    • Receivers (both flight control and video)
    • OSD
    • Antennas
    • Ground Station Equipment
    • Goggles/Video display
    • And anything else I'm forgetting


    This is my way of trying to learn from other's mistakes and experiences, even though it rarely seems to work for me

  2. #2
    Pat h0tr0d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Brenham, Tx.
    Posts
    1,087
    The best thing to do is start simple with a cheap plane. Read this thread.

  3. #3
    on a vacation brosius85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    bathurst nsw
    Posts
    2,250
    maximum safety and reliability come not only from components but from build experience and flying experience.

    you could have a perfect plane with fancy bits and peices all over it but in the hands of a novice it would be a complete waste.

    e.g: you buy a 100km capable video link.... you need to know where to set it up. if you are in a high noise area for your chosen frequency, and you fly your plane into a higher noise area, this will kill the link long before the theoretical 100km.

    best way is to start small and pick up the EXPERIENCE, not just the theory.

    don't mean to sabotage the whole thread but having the ultimate components is less than 1/2 of the ingredients IMO. you need to know how this shit works. backwards.


    all that aside lol

    my ultimate list right now

    • Airframe - Ritewing D50, fully riteweaved, roket 3670 880kv inrunner, castle HV160 lite, 8x8 prop, 4000w - 200mph hahahaaaa
    • Camera(s) - TBS69
    • Batteries - nanotech 65 -130c 11s 4000 (would also need some kind of switching regulators etc. for the 12v required for FPV equip.
    • Transmitters - (both flight control and video) futaba 9c + EzUHF, LM 500mw 2.4 (tuned by TBS thanks hehe )
    • Receivers (both flight control and video) - EzUHF diversity RX, LM tuned Rx (from TBS of course) maybe an oracle and another LM rx
    • OSD - EzOSD (derr
    • Antennas - i wouldn't mind trying out some CP stuff care of ibcrazy black cannon and a cloverleaf. also the standard whip and a few patches, 8, 11, 14db.
    • Ground Station Equipment - EzAntennaTracker... i guess.... i have never felt the need for one, but what the hell. why not. + FpvJapan DVR
    • Goggles/Video display - cinemizers.... if you can be bothered cutting them up and sticking them back together.... a major pain in the arse if you ask me. if not, FS dominators.
    • And anything else I'm forgetting - a nice tripod, a caddy to carry the plane, some plane tickets to travel to nice locations, someone to go charge all my batteries so i don't have to babysit them , A GoPro HD 2 , a ..... oh.... now im rambling.




    aaaanyway welcome pancake hope you stick around.

  4. #4
    His Royal Sassiness ssassen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    9,694
    Start simple, as 99,999% crash their first plane at least a few times, so buy a cheap foamy and install a camera and a Vtx/Vrx and get your feet wet first. Consider this 1st plane a write off and use it to gain the required experience. If you don't this indeed *will* be an expensive hobby.
    Purveyor of the FPV secret sauce at ImmersionRC

  5. #5
    on a vacation brosius85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    bathurst nsw
    Posts
    2,250
    i consider my second plane a write off.

    first plane is still good to go :P

    first plane with 2000w is definetly a write off lol

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by brosius85 View Post
    maximum safety and reliability come not only from components but from build experience and flying experience.

    you could have a perfect plane with fancy bits and peices all over it but in the hands of a novice it would be a complete waste.

    e.g: you buy a 100km capable video link.... you need to know where to set it up. if you are in a high noise area for your chosen frequency, and you fly your plane into a higher noise area, this will kill the link long before the theoretical 100km.

    best way is to start small and pick up the EXPERIENCE, not just the theory.

    don't mean to sabotage the whole thread but having the ultimate components is less than 1/2 of the ingredients IMO. you need to know how this shit works. backwards.


    all that aside lol

    my ultimate list right now

    • Airframe - Ritewing D50, fully riteweaved, roket 3670 880kv inrunner, castle HV160 lite, 8x8 prop, 4000w - 200mph hahahaaaa
    • Camera(s) - TBS69
    • Batteries - nanotech 65 -130c 11s 4000 (would also need some kind of switching regulators etc. for the 12v required for FPV equip.
    • Transmitters - (both flight control and video) futaba 9c + EzUHF, LM 500mw 2.4 (tuned by TBS thanks hehe )
    • Receivers (both flight control and video) - EzUHF diversity RX, LM tuned Rx (from TBS of course) maybe an oracle and another LM rx
    • OSD - EzOSD (derr
    • Antennas - i wouldn't mind trying out some CP stuff care of ibcrazy black cannon and a cloverleaf. also the standard whip and a few patches, 8, 11, 14db.
    • Ground Station Equipment - EzAntennaTracker... i guess.... i have never felt the need for one, but what the hell. why not. + FpvJapan DVR
    • Goggles/Video display - cinemizers.... if you can be bothered cutting them up and sticking them back together.... a major pain in the arse if you ask me. if not, FS dominators.
    • And anything else I'm forgetting - a nice tripod, a caddy to carry the plane, some plane tickets to travel to nice locations, someone to go charge all my batteries so i don't have to babysit them , A GoPro HD 2 , a ..... oh.... now im rambling.




    aaaanyway welcome pancake hope you stick around.
    Awesome, thanks for the input! I agree 100% that experience is the majority of what's needed, I've found that out from some previous failed attempts. That being said, I'm looking to start small and build my way up. I just figured that getting some decent equipment the first time might be a nice advantage when going through the upgrade/learning process as long as it can be recycled into the new version. For example, perhaps a quality Rx could survive my first few inexpensive airframes until I get that experience under my belt and upgrade to something more advanced.

  7. #7
    unplugged
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,661
    HA Brosius you and I think alike. . . I got about 85% of your list.
    There are a couple of items a chose to go cheaper but you musta be readin' my mind.
    OH and the 3670 880. . . . Chris WILL be gettin a call on that one from me 4kw. . .

    Pancake. . . Listen to Brosius and ssassen. . . they both are trying to set you up to succeed. Your first FPV plane will most likely be TRASHED in 6months or less
    Buy top end gear on the ground. . . usually your ground station won't hit a tree, usually. LOL

  8. #8
    Pat h0tr0d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Brenham, Tx.
    Posts
    1,087
    I think a good takeaway from what brosius posted is this:
    Futaba 9C

    Grab a Futaba 9C or 10C on 72Mhz for your transmitter. Get a corona RP8D1 receiver. Get an immersion 500mW 2.4Ghz VTX and Airwave or Immersion video receiver (assuming you won't be flying with others who fly on 2.4Ghz). Grab an 8dbi patch. Find a decent 5V camera to ease the wiring from the immersion vtx or 12V step-up. Pick either some fatshark goggles, or a haier tv to start with. You'll also need a tripod for the patch.

    As far as the airframe is concerned, the EasyStar is a good choice...the foam is excellent and forgiving for beginners. You'll need some 3S 2200 lipo batteries (I recommend 20-25C) and a decent charger. The iCharger 206b will allow for some growing pains when you get a different airframe and use bigger batteries.

    Now, this isn't the ultimate setup...but almost everything I've listed is stuff that you'd want to hang on to, even when you've become a more advanced pilot. Maybe that will help you a little bit, but you've got a long road of research ahead of you before you should start clicking the buy button at ReadyMadeRC. Oh yeah, buy from Tim because he's the man!

    EDIT: If you live in the city, 2.4 video could be crap...so you need to research the pluses and minuses of the different frequency video systems and choose accordingly.

  9. #9
    Who I am^^ Stuff I Say>> Reverand Blue Chip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Orlando Flori-Duh
    Posts
    1,366
    There is nothing that I can add to the above.. I agree with it all.

    HOWEVER -

    Just a word of caution. I read your thread title and laughed a bit. What I read was this "Noob with money wants to buy his way into the hobby." Maybe that's not the case - but I remember my first post related to FPV a few years back - guess what.... same title.

    Tell you a real quick story. I started with an EasyStar on 72mhz. 900/500 vtx and a patch. It was GREAT! Then I decided that I wanted to start speding money at a much greater rate... Yagi's, diversity, trackers, OSD's, bigger batteries, recording, goggles, new motors, higher power vtx's, long range systems.... you name it. Since money wasn't the limiting factor - I essentially stopped doing my own research and started doing what others were doing.... note - I did't say that I was following their advice - I said that I was doing what they were doing.

    The hard and fast rule of FPV is "it depends." Needless to say - I bought myself into equipment that didn't work for my area, wasn't matched to my other components, and generally casued me more issues than it solved. 4 months ago I told my wife that I would give FPV one last final chance.... if I couldn't get the systems to work the way I wanted them to - I would sell it all and move on.

    I tore everything out of my planes and went back to basics. I started to do my own research. I started asking the advice of others that were successful - and I admitted my own limitations. I embraced the fact that I couldn't buy my way into a perfect FPV system - money can only get you so far. Knowledge is power in this hobby.

    I share this becasue I don't want you to follow the same road that I did. I didn't go cheap on the equipment I bought - I simply did what others were doing without understanding why. That was a mistake.

    Moral of the story - start simple. Enjoy the simplicity. Buy a plane and equipment that you can learn on - and that you won't be wrecked when you crash or lose it. Its a whole different ball game when you throw $1K into the air versus $200.

  10. #10
    Is that a drouuune!? sim_io's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    856
    Money is no object for you, but spending it all in your first plane isn't necessary. Spending it in the right gear such as a radio Futaba 9c, Dragon Link for solid link, Fat Sharks for glasses (although you should have a screen) is important.

    One of your questions will soon be, should I buy an OSD or not? Many started with one and many without one. I personally never needed one, although an arrow that points home is great you should start by flying without one, it forces you to pay more attention to the landmarks quicker, soon you'll develop a sense where you know your surroundings really well, everything looks different up there. I flew 3 miles away with no OSD all I had to do was follow the river back.

    For video transmitters it all depends, but 1.2Ghz is really good, I have been using it forever and it's more solid now than my control link and well proven throughout the forums, it thrives where 2.4Ghz sometimes can't, the urban areas.

    Use your wife as a spotter for when you stare at the screen for too long and don't know how to get back.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Developing the Ultimate FPV Video Link
    By sircana in forum IFR - Video Link Discussion
    Replies: 157
    Last Post: 2nd November 2015, 12:53 PM
  2. Spend my money on LRS or FM
    By schnellschnell in forum IFR - Video Link Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10th January 2012, 01:13 AM
  3. Why spend the money?
    By Myron in forum IFR - Video Link Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 1st November 2011, 02:52 PM
  4. So many OSDs, so little money!
    By Clipper99 in forum IFR - Video Link Discussion
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12th August 2011, 09:56 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •