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Thread: 12.1 (4:3) vs 10.1 (16:9) monitor

  1. #1
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    12.1 (4:3) vs 10.1 (16:9) monitor

    Hey guys,

    I was wondering which monitor would be the best for me. I want to use the monitor for a groundstation.
    The 10.1 inch is lighter, brighter and has a higher resolution. But the output of the receiver 4:3. Wouldn't i get a much clearder image production on a 4:3 monitor?

    Anyway im confused and dont know which to pick.
    I am already using the 8 inch one mounted on my transmitter.
    Last edited by QuanDar; 19th December 2013 at 07:11 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuanDar View Post
    Hey guys,

    I was wondering which monitor would be the best for me. I want to use the monitor for a groundstation.
    The 10.1 inch is lighter, brighter and has a higher resolution. But the output of the receiver 4:3. Wouldn't i get a much clearder image production on a 4:3 monitor?

    Anyway im confused and dont know which to pick.
    I am already using the 8 inch one mounted on my transmitter.
    The biggest difference with the 12.1" monitor is that it is 4:3, so the apparent overall size increase is significant compared to the others. The image is stretched on the other monitors (with an option to show it in 4:3 which makes the image smaller and wastes some space), but the basic image you'd see on the 10.1" is the same as your 8"...just larger. When it comes to "clearer" image..that's somewhat subjective. Larger images will allow you to see small details better if they are in the video signal, but also will make it more evident that we are working with standard definition video signals. All in all, if I'm not attaching a monitor to my radio and holding the weight with a strap or my hands, I'd go with the 12.1" first, 10.1" second. The finish on the 12.1" screen is a bit better for reducing glare than the 10.1"

    Sorry, I know that was a bit rambling, but people choose the different sizes for different reasons, so I'm not sure what the best answer is for you.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReadyMadeRC View Post
    The biggest difference with the 12.1" monitor is that it is 4:3, so the apparent overall size increase is significant compared to the others. The image is stretched on the other monitors (with an option to show it in 4:3 which makes the image smaller and wastes some space), but the basic image you'd see on the 10.1" is the same as your 8"...just larger. When it comes to "clearer" image..that's somewhat subjective. Larger images will allow you to see small details better if they are in the video signal, but also will make it more evident that we are working with standard definition video signals. All in all, if I'm not attaching a monitor to my radio and holding the weight with a strap or my hands, I'd go with the 12.1" first, 10.1" second. The finish on the 12.1" screen is a bit better for reducing glare than the 10.1"

    Sorry, I know that was a bit rambling, but people choose the different sizes for different reasons, so I'm not sure what the best answer is for you.
    Thanks for the fast reply!

    To clear things up.
    Example: when the resolution of the monitor does not match the input resolution and the monitor can't scale correctly you will get distortion. Its like putting a Macbook retina resolution from 2880x1600 > 1920x1080, the image look pixelated. But when you change the resolution from 2880x1600 = 5184000 pixels | 5184000 /4 = 129600| to1440900 = 1296000 the result will be a very sharp image on a lower output resolution.

    With this knowlegde i tried to choose the best monitor for FPV. But that is not that easy since everything is analog (TVL). My FPV camera has 690TVL and when im right that will be converted in a resolution of 768(H)x548(V).
    And Google was not very helpfull either :P I understand that my question cant be anwhered, maybe i am trying to hard! I love figuring things out, wish i had more time =]

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luculenus View Post
    Thanks for the fast reply!

    To clear things up.
    Example: when the resolution of the monitor does not match the input resolution and the monitor can't scale correctly you will get distortion. Its like putting a Macbook retina resolution from 2880x1600 > 1920x1080, the image look pixelated. But when you change the resolution from 2880x1600 = 5184000 pixels | 5184000 /4 = 129600| to1440900 = 1296000 the result will be a very sharp image on a lower output resolution.

    With this knowlegde i tried to choose the best monitor for FPV. But that is not that easy since everything is analog (TVL). My FPV camera has 690TVL and when im right that will be converted in a resolution of 768(H)x548(V).
    And Google was not very helpfull either :P I understand that my question cant be anwhered, maybe i am trying to hard! I love figuring things out, wish i had more time =]
    Things definitely can get confusing with this stuff. Analog video isn't measured in the same way we think of digital video. A 690tvl camera (NTSC) is supposed to be able to resolve details that are basically the equivalent of 690 points horizontally (i.e. 690x480i). Analog signals are interlaced, so it's almost like it's 690x240p at 30Hz, or 690x480 at 15Hz (not exactly, but it's an easier way to look at it).

    This means that a 700tvl camera is sort of like 700x480i, a 420tvl camera is sort of like 420x480i. 700tvl is about the most any analog SD circuits can handle, which is why our PRO700 camera, which actually has a chip capable 960 tvl resolution, is rated at 700tvl...any tests would show that's the extent of what it can resolve. We're not going to overinflate our tvl ratings just to make people think they are getting something better. There IS some advantage to higher resolution sensors, as they can use the extra resolution internally to help with image processing. With all that, those horizontal pixels (vertical lines) aren't lined up perfectly like a computer monitor anyway.

    That wasn't our question, though. How does that translate to the monitor? Since analog sd video signals aren't really a "pixel by pixel" signal, you probably won't see any of the same moire or distortion effects you see when a computer monitor is set to the incorrect resolution. The monitors are processing and re-displaying the signal anyway, and probably not matching things up dead on to the pixels anyway even if it happened to be a 690x480 LCD display.

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