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Thread: FPV PILOT TRAINING CENTER - YOUR ROAD TO FPV SUCCESS

  1. #1
    Tha Bawss
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    FPV PILOT TRAINING CENTER - YOUR ROAD TO FPV SUCCESS

    This is for information related to the NEW FPV pilots who are just starting to do research or have questions about their initial FPV plans.

    ** all content posted here will be reviewed and placed in a neat and orderly fashion. Don't be suprised of posts are deleted, pertinent content will still be maintained**

    How to be successful in FPV guide: FPV success Rev3.doc

    How to be successful in FPV video tutorials



























    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by IBCrazy; 23rd May 2014 at 08:23 AM.
    FPVLAB --- The World's Leading FPV Collective - FPVLab on Facebook and FPVLab on Twitter

  2. #2
    Tha Bawss
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    FPV RETAILERS

    *** FPVLAB SUPPORTED ** ReadyMadeRC - Operated out of southern Ohio, USA - Tim's (MR. Pibb) site is dedicated solely to our hobby. He is an avid video pilot like us. Tim seems to pride his site on having performance proven equipment and customer relations. Ready made RC is geared towards giving newcomers an easy way into the FPV hobby.

    *** FPVLAB SUPPORTED ** Video Aerial Systems - Operated out of Virginia, USA, - Alex's (IBCrazy) site is dedicated to R&D for FPV systems. An avid FPV pilot and young engineer, Alex believes in keeping much of the research and development information public to build trust and customer relations. Video Aerial systems is dedicated to getting the best performance from any FPV system via customized equipment for the FPV hobby.

    *** FPVLAB SUPPORTED ** ImmersionRC

    TrueRC - Operated out of Canada, Hugo (HugeOne) develops his own antenna systems. Hugo's site is dedicated to performance products and takes the guess work out of your purchase. They recently partnered with Video Aeiral Systems for antenna development.

    Hobby Wireless: http://www.hobbywireless.com - Operated out of Texas, USA, Hobbywireless is one of the more versatile stores which has a full-time customer support crew and hotline! Hobbywiress is known to stock those older hard to find items as well as the latest technology.

    DPCAV - Operated out of California, USA - Thomas (MR RC-Cam) is a true electronics wizard. He develops many of his own products and is very helpful with people building their own. He also has a hobby DIY website. DPCAV is dedicated to electronics hobbyists and FPV pilots alike.

    New Generation Hobbies - Operated out of Canada, Zoltan (Oxyfxx) has perhaps the biggest stock of FPV specific gear. Zoltan is a developer of FPV equipent and is currently developing a system that may revolutionize our hobby. NGHobbies is dedicated to giving the best selection of proven FPV gear available.

    Flytron - Operated out of Istanbul, Turkey - Melih (MelihK) is an electronics/software tech who enjoys hacking our fpv systems and open-sourcing it to the public. A designer of much FPV gear, Flytron is dedicated to people who like to hack into their gear to get the best possible FPV experience.

    Range Video - Operated out of Miami, FL - Vova (Reznikvova) was one of the first to dedicate a site to the FPV hobby. A young entreprenuer, Vova's site is perhaps the easiest to navigate and has performance specs on many of his products.

    Future Hobbies - One of the original FPV vendors, Future hobbies focuses on a small variation of performance products. A very seasoned entreprenuer, Wade is focusing on customer support and service.
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:52 AM.
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  3. #3
    Tha Bawss
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    Selecting your frequency - How

    Selecting frequency

    One of the first things you need to choose in what frequency you want to use. Selecting a frequency is mainly trying to have a low noise floor. This means you want a frequency that has the least RF traffic around it. This will vary from location to location.

    Therefore before selecting consider the following:

    900MHz - Generally speaking this band is capable of the longest range. However it operates very near the GSM (cell phone G3) band. If there are lots of cell phone towers around, stay off this frequency. Leaving your cell phone in the car generally increases range by a factor of 3 or more. Late at night, stand up on a high structure at your intended flying sites. Look for towers of red lights. If there are none, you should be ok. If there is a sea of red lights, find another band.

    1.3GHz- Comprising of 2 channels: 1258 and 1280MHz, 1.3GHz is generally the best all around band for object penetration, range, and low noise floor. A generally safe band for mid range flight, 1.1/1.3GHz operates on the third harmonic of UHF (433MHz) making separation and good filtration critical for long range missions. This is very close to repeater tower frequency in certain areas as well. If you are around a lot of communications towers or have a cheap/old long range UHF system, it might cause shortened range. Issues with Chainlink and 1.3GHz are well known and documented. It is also know to interfere with 2.4GHz control. If using 2.4GHz control, use a filter on the 1.3 GHz system.

    2.3GHz - Just outside of the WiFi band is the 2.3GHz band comprising of 2 channels: 2305 and 2396MHz. 2.3 GHz is far enough away from 2.4GHz that it enables you to fly with other pilots who operate 2.4GHz radios but it is not recommended that you use a 2.4GHz radio with 2.3GHz video. This band also allows you to fly with other pilots on 1.3GHz without issues. Another great thing is that 2.4GHz antennas can be used with minimal reduction in range. The downside is that 2.3GHz is also used for some commercial uses such as satellite radio and thus it is not always clean everywhere. However in general this band is considered a very clean and useful band for FPV.

    2.4GHz - A very versatile band with the capability to fly multiple pilots on one band. This has a huge selection of antennas available. Unfortunately, it's a very popular radio transmitter frequency. You cannot fly this band if you use a 2.4GHz radio transmitter. This is also affected by Wifi systems. Generally Wifi is not a problem except for mobile phones used as Wifi hotspots or if you are in a heavily populated area. You also want to stay away from other pilots who use 2.4GHz for control.

    5.8GHz - Perhaps the cleanest noise floor, but the worst band for multipathing and blockage issues. Use of circular polarization is more or less necessity. However the noise floor is incredibly low everywhere. Thus this band has the shortest range capabilities, but the most consistent performance. The antennas are extremely small and so is the equipment. It works with all control systems from 35MHz to 2.4GHz. For short range around the park flying, 5.8GHz does the job.
    Last edited by IBCrazy; 18th October 2012 at 01:04 PM.
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  4. #4
    Tha Bawss
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    Selecting antenna/polarization type

    Once you have found a frequency, you now need an antenna system. What should you choose? Here's a quick reference to help you choose what antennas will work best for you.

    POLARIZATION TYPE

    Circular

    Generally speaking, most people will prefer circular polarization. Use of circular on both ends of the system nearly eliminates multipath interference which is the #1 cause of video drop outs. Circular polarization gives predictable, consistent video link and does not lose polarization when banking. The other advantage of circular is that it tends to have more "punch" to penetrate objects such as houses and trees.

    The downside of circular is that the antennas are usually large and not very durable. At 910 MHz a CP omni measures 6.5" in diameter and 3.5" tall! At 1280MHz this is 4.5 wide and 2" tall, which is more manageable, but still large. At 2.4 GHz, the antenna drops to the size of a ping pong ball and 5.8Ghz is as big as a large marble. Higher frequencies make CP much smaller and easier to manage.

    Linear

    Linear polarization has the potential to go 40% farther than circular. In a perfect World linear would rule. However many times outside issues cause problems with linear polarization and thus it's full range is almost never realized at low antenna gains. On the other hand, as range requires higher gain antennas, the antenna naturally rejects multipathing better due to directionality and thus for high gain, extreme long range systems, linear is comparable to circular, if not better.

    The advantage of linear polarization is that the antennas are small, cheap, and plentiful.

    Mixing polarizations

    Generally this is less than optimal. In some instances it may be preferable to have a CP antenna on the ground and a linear one in the air. One reason to choose this configuration is when the size of the TX antenna would make CP difficult.

    Another configuration would be CP in the air and a high gain linear on the ground. The only reason to do this is when you need more gain than you can find in a CP ground antenna.
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:52 AM.
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  5. #5
    Tha Bawss
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    What NOT to buy for starting out

    I see this time and time again: UHF systems on planes that have no reason to have them. I see newbies, quadcopters, and parkflyers with LRS. I also see nearly every plane toting a GoPro.

    STOP! Why are you buying these?

    Why do people feel the need for LRS when they obviously fly well within 35/72MHz range? A mile is easy with 72MHz. Why are so many people using LRS? Simple: they do not know any better.

    When did a GoPro become a requirement? Why not carry another battery for extended flight times or just forget it all together and have a lighter, more nimble (and cheaper) aircraft? Why are GoPro's so common? Two reasons: 1. Newbies think the video quality will be better on theor screen (completely false). 2. They want to post videos.

    -----------------------------------------------

    With LRS, you run into new problems. LRS tends to have a very dirty transmission that weakens your video link. Some are better than others, but all of them require additional protection to keep them from harming your video in some way. Most people go with additional separation.

    And the GoPro... Really? Why? What exactly is it doing to help you enjoy your flight? You are not getting HD back to your goggles. The only reason to post a video on the internet and for the most part, a $15 keychain camera does incredibly well and it's 1/6th the size and weight.


    Think about why you are buying something expensive before you buy it! If it's your first FPV plane, there should be no GoPro or LRS on it. That said, if you have a park flyer radio (like a DX6i) that is not suitable for FPV either.

    -Alex
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:52 AM.
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  6. #6
    Tha Bawss
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    How to choose an airplane

    As fundamental as this seems, most people put little thought into this step. When selecting and FPV plane, 3 things should be considered:

    1. What is your goal with this airplane?

    2. What is your level of experience?

    3. What do you want the plane to feel like?

    4. Are your goals realistic?


    Let's go about these one at a time, but in reverse order. Since you are in the beginners area, I'll assume you are fairly new to the hobby:

    4. Goals: If this is your first FPV plane long range is not a realistic goal. Your first plane should simply get you the feel for FPV. If you are an experienced point of view pilot and want to do aerobatics, chances are a good pattern plane or even a light flying wing would do well for you even if it is your first FPV ship. Generally, you will want it a bit more stable than something you would fly point of view, but if you dull it out too much, you will be craving more performance.

    3. Feel: Some people just can't stand to have the propeller up front. They want to feel as if they were flying unobstructed. However, many of us like the spinning prop out front. It makes it feel like we are part of the aircraft and actually inside it. Interestingly enuogh, a stiff airplane and a spongy one feel very much alike, so a fiberglassed rigid plane isn't necessarily needed for performance feel.

    2: Experience: If you are an experienced POV pilot, chances are and Easy Star or SkyWalker, ect is going to be underwhelming. You will want more performance as you will be trying to fly it like a real airplane. However if you are new to RC aircraft, look for a good stable airframe like a high wing trainer. Durability will be important.

    1. What do you want it to do? Having enough power to go unlimited vertical in FPV is generally not necessary because the view turns completely to sky at a 45 degree climb. Do you want to fly high and take in the scenery? Look for a nice lofty airplane. Ride thermals? You want a glider, but not loaded with excessive weight. Long flight times? Look for a plane that can hold a larger battery. Looking for aerobatics? Look for something smaller in the 40-48" wingspan range.

    Now you should have a good idea what kind of plane you want. Don't just copy someone else's plane. Get the performance you want, not what everyone else is flying.

    -Alex
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:52 AM.
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  7. #7
    Tha Bawss
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    Lesson's every newbie will learn (Reposted from Brainshell)

    Lesson 1) Start simple. I initially did a ton of research and bought every component I thought I wanted. (OSD, Autopilot, TX, RX, goggles, diversity, antenna tracking, head-tracking, etc.). I spent countless hours trying to get it all working together before I even attempted my first flight. I figured my technical prowess made me somehow immune to the KISS rule and I'd be fine diving in head first. All I accomplished was making myself frustrated.

    Eventually, I stripped the system down to the bare minimum (Camera, transmitter, receiver, and LCD screen) and just FLEW (with a spotter, of course). It was AWESOME! I landed the plane, took it home, and added the pan-tilt system, then flew again. Then I added the goggles, and flew again. I learned that each component made the experience completely new again, and even more complex. The downside? It takes a LOT of time. Like most of you, I have a day-job and a family, which means LIMITED time to work on this stuff.

    Besides, had I managed to get myself flying with all the gizmos on day-1, I likely would have crashed due to "too many moving parts". Despite having a nearly unlimited budget, and lots of technical prowess in both electronics and radios, I was eventually forced to walk before I could run.

    Accept the fact that it's going to take you a few weeks (or months) to get all the toys working, and focus on the small victories.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 2) The little things matter. A LOT. I really thought the "little things" were for people trying to squeeze an extra half-mile out of their setup, or trying to make the picture just a little more clear. I was dead wrong. It turns out, the little things are the difference between amazing success and complete failure. When someone tells you that you ought to install a filter somewhere, or shield your wires, or move your GPS a little further from your transmitter, DO IT. I learned that these (seemingly) little things can have more of an impact then spending hundreds of dollars on newer / better gear. And in some cases, they're the ONLY solution.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 3) A lot of this gear doesn't work with each other. Do a LOT of homework before you buy stuff to make sure it's all going to be compatible. (Example, I bought a pair of FoxTech goggles, only to learn that the built-in receiver wouldn't work with my ImmersionRC transmitter!). A little research before my purchase would have saved me a lot of headaches here. It simply did not occur to me that a 5.8ghz receiver might not be compatible with another 5.8ghz transmitter. Another example? None of the head-tracking systems will work with my JR-9503. Choose your gear carefully.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 4) When deciding whether you should be using 5.8ghz, 2.4ghz, 1.2ghz, or 900mhz -- the answer REALLY IS "it depends". I just couldn't come to grips with the idea that there would be such dramatic difference between these. Here's the rub: There are pros and cons to each (you should do enough research to know EXACTLY what those pros and cons are). But in the end, it really depends on where you happen to be standing. A half-mile in any given direction might completely change your choice. So how do you pick? The truth it, you're probably going to end up trying them all.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 5) We all dream of flying 15+ miles and zooming around the countryside, but it's not realistic until you've got years of experience. I know, I thought I was immune to this rule too. I figured if I spent enough money and bought top of the line everything, and all the different gear I needed, I'd have my plane flying 10+ miles within a week or two. "Surely", I thought, "the only reason MOST people aren't flying those distances is because of budget, or lack of RF knowledge". I got humbled REALLY quick. My first flight where I flew beyond the range of my spotter was an immense victory (it was probably my 10th flight). I'm still aiming for the 2-mile mark. Set your goals small, and know that big goals mean big-time experience.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 6) This stuff is actually not that complex, but if you're not comfortable holding a soldering iron, it's probably not for you. Lots of wire cutting, splicing, soldering, and other such fun. At first, I wanted to avoid all that and try to get something that would "just work". After dozens of hours and countless dollars trying to do just that, I picked up a soldering iron a fit of frustration one day and realized it's MUCH easier to just build the things you need than it is to try and find / order everything.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 7) A little understanding of RF theory goes a long way. Thank heavens I came into this with tons of ham radio experience, so I understood simple concepts like why you don't want to run a transmitter without an antenna, why the orientation of the antenna matters so much, or why 500mw on 5.8ghz is less effective than 200mw on 900mhz. Get your ham radio license and really understand what's in the test rather than just memorizing the Q&A.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 8) The gear works, but it's not commercial grade by any standard. I was surprised to find that most of this stuff comes straight from China, it's poorly (if ever) documented, and it's really up to you to figure out how to make it all work together. While not the end of the world, it certainly was not what I was expecting to be getting myself into. The fact that the gear is not particularly robust makes it all the more important to spend the time to get it EXACTLY right, and test it, test it, and test it some more.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 9) To whatever extent possible, try to be alone. I'm not saying you should fly without a spotter (you should have a spotter, especially when you're new). But I learned quickly that if I was with a group, there was a lot of pressure to perform. I learned that my time in the field was best spent when I could spend as much time as I needed on a particular problem, without feeling the pressure of having other folks watching or waiting. Find a wide open space where you can tweak, fly, repeat as much as you need.

    ----------------------
    Lesson 10) The guys in the online forums are actually super nice and helpful as long as you approach them with the appropriate level of humility. I've been extremely impressed with the community here. Ask your question nicely, provide the relevant detail, and explain clearly the results you are trying to achieve. Then, re-read your post to make sure you don't sound like a whiny little ass before you submit. Be prepared to do a lot of reading (sometimes answers to questions come in the form of long threads). Be understanding if nobody wants to repeat what's already been discussed.
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:52 AM.
    FPVLAB --- The World's Leading FPV Collective - FPVLab on Facebook and FPVLab on Twitter

  8. #8
    Tha Bawss
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    How to develop your skills!

    Ok, so this is yet another step everybody wants to skip. You need to crawl before you can walk and walk before you can run.

    Crawling:

    Generally speaking the crawl part is simply getting a basic plane into the air and dropping the goggles down. At this point you still have a pretty basic plane. You probably should have a set of circularly polarized omni directional antennas so you can focus on your flight instead of worrying about video drop outs. You will want a spotter here, but you will become more comfortable and be ready to solo before it's time for the next step.

    Now how do you walk?

    So now you have flown FPV. Maybe even flown solo a time or two. If you want OSD, now is the time to add it. Get used to it's features and uses, but forget about autopilot or stabilization right now. Just keep it basic. Now this might suprise you, but switch out your good antenna set for the stock antennas. Fly it. Play with the location of the antennas. Change flight locations, ground station configurations. See what works and what doesn't. Try to get the best performance out of the stock antennas you can. Why? Simple, linear punishes a bad setup. Not only are you learning how things affect your plane, but you are also now learning how to fly through interference. When you go back to your good antennas, you will have a much better system than you originally installed simply because you have more margin now.

    Am I ready to run?

    Not yet. Time to jog now. Now you need to learn to aim a directinal antenna. Start with a good 7-9 db antenna. Linear or circular, your choice. Deliberately fly outside the beam and bring it back (video will not drop out immediately, trust me). Aim that antenna at cell towers or other sources of radio waves and see what happens. You are now learning more about RF and noise floor. Drop behind some trees, maybe a house at close range and keep it flying. Learn what is acceptable and when the video really is going to drop out. Here is where you might want to install the LRS, but it's not necessary at this point.

    Running:

    Ok, ready to run? Grab that LRS system and install it because now you are ready for it. This is where reality is going to hit your original goals in the hobby. Choose your frequency and antennas wisely based on your experience. If you want return to home for security, test it here. Once you have everything ready to go, aim your antenna to a point off in the distance you want to fly to and go for it. Start by flying high and then circle every minute or so and lose altitude as you circle. Test your RF link. If it looks good, climb again and go further. Chances are if you could see your target, it is within 4 miles. This is long range FPV. If you don't think it is, try walking it. Don't jump the gun. Add distance slowly. Remember for every mile out you intend to go, you need to fly 2 miles because you need to come back. You want to fly into a head wind, not a tail wind on your outgoing leg so you can make it back home with room to spare.

    -Alex
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:53 AM.
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  9. #9
    Tha Bawss
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    Explanation of RF radiation from Sander:
    Quote Originally Posted by ssassen View Post
    How 'far' you can go on any frequency depends on a few factors, let me give you a little backgrounder in layman's terms:

    1. Free space loss:

    This is the first thing to consider, as it affects ANY and ALL radio frequency (RF) communications. It is the inherent loss (=attenuation) of a radio frequency wave traveling through the air, the higher the frequency the more loss/attenuation there is per km/mile the radio wave travels. I.e. at similar output power, say 500mW, a 1.2GHz transmitter will give you less attenuation at X km/mile than a 500mW 5.8GHz transmitter, hence the net loss at X km/mile is LOWER when the frequency is LOWER.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-space_path_loss

    2. Transmitter output power:

    It doesn't take a genius to figure out that the more output power your transmitter has the further its signal will travel. However the attenuation seen by the free space loss described in 1. is the same, i.e. if a 500mW 1.2GHz transmitter looses 10dB over X meter/feet then a 1000mW will as well. If you look at transmitter output power more closely it becomes clear that to double your range you need to quadruple your transmitter output power. Hence if you're using a 500mW transmitter and would like to fly further, a 800mW or 1000mW isn't really going to make a difference, that's just adding a mere few (hundred) meters/feet at best. No, if you really want to see a significant increase in range you'll need 4x that, to double your range, which equates to at least a 2W transmitter.

    In reality anything over 500mW is overkill because there's more gains to be had, literally, at the receiving end, but we'll get to that later. The more power your transmitter puts out the more power it drains, the hotter it gets due to inherent losses inside the transmitter that are dissipated as heat and the more strain it puts on the sensitive electronics on your plane which are bombarded with an overdose of RF waves. This overdose of RF makes your servos twitch, desensitizes RC receivers and can create all kinds of other problems.

    3. Antennas and link budget:

    Antennas are for RF waves what a reflector is for a flashlight's light bulb. Just like a flashlight's reflector they can focus the beam of RF waves into a coherent beam or pattern, which then can be used to your advantage. As discussed you can increase your range by upping your transmitter power, but that quickly becomes tricky as the output power required to see significant gains in range quickly rises. If you want to double your 500mW range then you need at least a 2W transmitter, if you want to double that again no less than 8W is required and so on. This quickly becomes unpractical and somewhat of a stupid approach, as there's easier, far more efficient, ways of increasing your range.

    So, what defines range to begin with you might wonder? Well, maximum range is where your receiver can no longer distinguish the signal your transmitter is putting out from the background noise. The point at which the signal gets lost amidst the noise is your maximum available link budget. That link budget however is a simple equation determined by 1., 2. and 3. (the antennas you're using.) Basically the link budget is described by:

    Received Power (dBm) = Transmitted Power (dBm) + Gains (dB) − Losses (dB)

    Simply put, if the received power equals the maximum sensitivity of your receiver you loose the signal, so if you have a typical receiver with -85dBm sensitivity then that's a known variable, so lets enter that:

    -85 = Transmitted Power (dBm) + Gains (dB) − Losses (dB)

    For argument's sake lets say we're using a 500mW transmitter, that equates to a transmitted power of 27dBm, so once more, lets enter that:

    -85 = 27 + Gains (dB) - Losses (dB)

    The gains in the above equation are the gains offered by the transmitter and receiver antenna, lets assume we're using the supplied whip antennas your transmitter and receiver shipped with, which have a typical gain of about 2dBi, hence the total gain is 4dB. Entering those into the equation gives us the following:

    -85 = 27 + 4 - Losses (dB)

    Now the losses are the sum of all losses between the transmitter output and the receiver input, hence this includes connector and cable losses and such. However in this case, as we're trying to keep it simple, lets just assume we're dealing with free space loss only. Now it is trivial to compute the free space loss and thus calculate the maximum range given the variables we entered previously:

    -85 = 27 + 4 - X
    X = -85 - (27+4)
    X = -116
    Losses (dB) = -116

    Hence the losses are -116dB, from this value the maximum range can be calculated given the frequency used and the equations mentioned in 1.

    Now what would be the easiest way of upping our link budget? Looking at the equation all variables are weighed the same, so where can we get the most gain with the least amount of work?

    The answer is antennas. So why is that? Well, I've already compared an antenna to the reflector on a flashlight. What does the reflector do to the light hitting it? Exactly, it focuses it into a coherent beam. Just imagine what happens if you are standing in a dark room and let a flashlight's beam hit the wall across the room, there'll be a bright spot on the wall with the rest of the room still being dark. In that spot however the brightness of the light is magnitudes greater than if you were to unscrew the reflector from the flashlight and just hold the flashlight above your head with the light bulb lighting up the entire room instead.

    However the total amount of light the light bulb puts out remains the same, the reflector just bundles the photons into a tight beam. The exact same happens with antennas, just with RF waves and in our case the reflector isn't on the transmitter, but on the receiver.

    A reflector that bundles RF waves is typically referred to as a directional antenna. A typical directional antenna has a gain of 8 - 20dBi, which means your link budget grows by the same amount. If you mount a simple 14dBi flat patch antenna to your receiver rather than the stock whip for example, you've more than quadrupled (!) your range. This however does make the antenna more directional, just like the reflector on a flashlight, hence you have to make sure you stay within its 'beam' so as not to loose the signal. But when you do, you'll be able to fly much further than with the stock whip.

    So, in summary, how 'far' you can go on a frequency, i.e. the maximum range, depends on 1, 2 and 3. With 3, antennas, being the easiest way of increasing your range, with the downside that you have to stay within the beam of the directional antenna where it offers the most gain.

    I hope that clarifies a few things for you pilot's in training, if not, or when further questions come to mind, be sure to leave a reply.
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:53 AM.
    FPVLAB --- The World's Leading FPV Collective - FPVLab on Facebook and FPVLab on Twitter

  10. #10
    Tha Bawss
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    How to ask for help:

    This seems so trivial, but it is very important to ask for help properly. When inquiring about something, follow these rules:

    1. Be precise - Make your question as accurate as possible. Include any information about location, time of flight, and any issue you are having. A flight video is great here. Video tells a thousdand words.

    2. Be brief - Shorter questions requiring less time to answer get answered faster.

    3. If you have a product in mind, mention it and mention why you are thinking about using it.

    4. Be humble - Asking a question humorously or humbly is going to get a better response than a question asked in anger. Sometimes the vendors will send you free gear for simply extending this courtesy!

    5. Do not inquire about stock status - Vendors get asked this all the time. Asking when something is coming in stock isn't going to change how long it takes you to get it. If you must, make two separate orders so you can get the stuff that is in stock and then when the out of stock stuff arrives, it gets shipped to you.


    Example of a good question:

    To whom it may concern,

    I am writing regarding a problem I am having with what I believe is unusually short range with my video. I was hoping to get 3-4 miles, but my range seems limited to about 1500-2000 feet. My system setup is as follows:

    XYZ transmitter with inverted Vee antenna
    ABC reciever with 8 dbi patch
    600TVL camera
    No OSD
    72MHz control with ABC RX

    Please see attached photo of my ground station and airplane setup. Here is a link to a short 30 second video I made of the disturbance: Youtube video link

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Best regards,

    - Your customer

    Example of the same question but written poorly:

    My range stinks!!! I can't get 1500 feet on this set up. What do I need to buy to go 3-4 miles? I have the ABC transmitter on my airplane.

    Thanks,

    -Your Customer


    Why the first question is better:

    1. It is tabulated. It's a quick and easy reference we don't need to read into more
    2. A picture is worth 1000 words
    3. A video tells more information than you could believe
    4. It shows the customer has some knowledge of what information is required to diagnose the problem
    5. This customer seems patient and humble.


    -Alex
    Last edited by FPVLAB; 3rd March 2013 at 12:53 AM.
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