PDA

View Full Version : IACP Governing Body Approves Unmanned Aircraft Guidelines



PDXDave
20th August 2012, 10:43 PM
This doesn't appear to have any bearing on those of us only engaged in FPV as a hobby, but I know a few folks on the Lab are using (or working towards using) FPV aircraft in various public safety roles -- law enforcement, SAR, forest fire mapping, etc., and this may have an impact on their efforts so I'm posting it as an FYI...

http://www.theiacp.org/portals/0/pdfs/IACP_UAGuidelines.pdf

Note item #4 under System Requirements:"The use of model aircraft, modified with cameras, or other sensors, is discouraged due to concerns over reliability and safety."


Not catastrophic, but it bears watching as the regs move forward.

Wearyman
20th August 2012, 11:23 PM
Well, that's just their own internal guidelines anyway. Not related to any FAA ruling. Frankly I don't see a problem with it. If they want to restrict themselves to costly overpriced "drones" from "pro" shops selling $200 worth of a balsa and lam plane for 10 grand then that's fine with me. That just means less police departments will be able to afford them.

PDXDave
21st August 2012, 12:00 AM
True, not FAA related, and it won't impact most of is. But there are a number of efforts underway around the country by people affiliated with law enforcement or other public safety agencies to use FPV aircraft as an inexpensive way of starting a UAS program. Some of those involved are frequent contributors to the Lab, and this could impact those efforts.

radialmind
21st August 2012, 02:24 AM
Op. Guidelines 2:


UAS will only be operated by personnel, both pilots and crew members, who have been trained and certified in the operation of the system. All agency personnel with UA responsibilities, including command officers, will be provided training in the policies and procedures governing their use.

Certified by whom, trained by whom, is the trainer certified as such? Is this such a line where these courses are assumed to be constrained to the platform vendor? (here's a plane, follow this course we invented to become "certified" in its use)...

hennisdk
21st August 2012, 04:25 AM
Op. Guidelines 2:



Certified by whom, trained by whom, is the trainer certified as such? Is this such a line where these courses are assumed to be constrained to the platform vendor? (here's a plane, follow this course we invented to become "certified" in its use)...

Ridiculous. They are always trying to limit all the fun stuff!

MASHTON1138
21st August 2012, 08:59 AM
Guys you should not be worrying about this document. It is a set of guidelines for Law Enforcement who wish or plan to use the technology in their department. It does not apply to hobbyists.

PDXDave
21st August 2012, 10:49 AM
Guys you should not be worrying about this document. It is a set of guidelines for Law Enforcement who wish or plan to use the technology in their department. It does not apply to hobbyists.

Agreed. I've edited the OP to reflect that I was posting this for those who are using FPV with public safety organizations, NOT hobbyists. Sorry for the confusion.

radialmind
21st August 2012, 02:29 PM
Guys you should not be worrying about this document. It is a set of guidelines for Law Enforcement who wish or plan to use the technology in their department. It does not apply to hobbyists.

I was actually asking because I'm interested in serving them and it' s good to know for hobbyists too... who does the certification?

MASHTON1138
21st August 2012, 05:22 PM
The certifications would be done by the manufactures of the birds the agency purchase ie. BAE, Lockheed, Boeing etc. at least at first, then the Agencies will have their own instructors. It is not likely that they will use or want our help once they buy their own equipment.

radialmind
22nd August 2012, 02:57 AM
The certifications would be done by the manufactures of the birds the agency purchase ie. BAE, Lockheed, Boeing etc. at least at first, then the Agencies will have their own instructors. It is not likely that they will use or want our help once they buy their own equipment.

ok, so that clarifies a lot, also taking a bit more time to read this through. It's basically training&certification on operation of the craft, which happens to include regulations of safety since a COA is involved.

Just had a look at the COA from FAA (these are US regulations only!). Civilian companies cannot request one. As a public agency, you must have one if you operate UAS's. A public agency may not act under the model aircraft standards:

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ato/service_units/systemops/aaim/organizations/uas/coa/faq/