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View Full Version : at what point is a gps osd needed?



stgdz
14th March 2013, 12:40 PM
So I have a couple of multi rotors and just starting out. I have low information odds on both, core on the disco and super simple odd on the Fri. Neither have GPS coordinates on either. I don't plan on flying very far with either as they are multi rotors.


So I asked myself at what point is one needed? I plan on practicing research with maps where I fly but I'm not seeing a GPS need atm. Am I correct?

WNCmotard
14th March 2013, 01:00 PM
I can totally see the need for the more advanced pilots out there who are flying low and dicing through trees, behind buildings, hauling ass low and flying far, etc. But I'm with you, for myself it will be a while before I need anything like that.

TZZDC1241
14th March 2013, 01:00 PM
GPS is useful for telling you how high, how far are you, can you go, and from the pilot (aka you). I find a GPS handy for the simple fact of having an arrow that tells me go here to return home. Maybe not so important on a quadcopter but it's nice to have if you're like me and starting out with FPV and getting use to it and maybe flying in an unfamiliar area.

swillhide
14th March 2013, 01:25 PM
If your familiar with the field GPS is just an add on. If you need to know how fast, how high, how far and all the little details then you need a GPS. My quad only has the TBS core with the bare minimum and I love it.

Vitamin J
14th March 2013, 02:48 PM
Distance from home and speed are probably the two biggest pieces of info the GPS adds. An arrow pointing home and altitude are also added benefits. I feel that having GPS coords on the screen is less helpful because if I lose video up high it won't be any more precise than my groundstation recording and if I lose video down low then again the recording will give me the same info.

TZZDC1241
14th March 2013, 03:07 PM
I haven't gotten around to groundstation recording yet, any recommendations on a box? I'm getting the EagleEyes station and a couple of TBS 2.4Ghz receivers with a tracker for RMRC. Wouldnt mind having a small LCD that at least shows coordinates.

Toysrme
14th March 2013, 03:17 PM
Don't feel like you're all alone because you don't have a GPS. MANY people don't fly with them. GPS/OSD is only *needed* when your navigational proweress is no longer adequate. i flew two years before i got my first one. many 3-4 mile flights, a flight near 6 miles. virtually every time i fly is 2 miles. you should know where your plane is WITHOUT gps! you should reasonably know how long your battery(s) should last power-on WITHOUT relying on a current meter. Set it to cruise throttle power settings & time how long it runs. Click a stopwatch on the ground when you fly.
Back on the GPS thing. I gave one of my good friends an FPV 2m glider two years ago. He's still yet to loose it. Absolutely raw rc pilot. Had a couple failed flights on a WildHawk, a few minutes of stick time on some of my planes. He navigates with one of the spherical bubble compasses glued way down on the nose. Like this:
http://www.czvanguard.com/UploadFile/2007922151141.gif

Where it really comes in handy is flying from locations you can't navigate back too easily/at all. I won't preach on that as it's part of the fun of FPV & I do it plenty too! #justsayin, if your only way to find your launch/land point is via one system with a dozen failure points... Rethink your flight / train your spider senses harder.

TZZDC1241
14th March 2013, 03:28 PM
Don't feel like you're all alone because you don't have a GPS. MANY people don't fly with them. GPS/OSD is only *needed* when your navigational proweress is no longer adequate. i flew two years before i got my first one. many 3-4 mile flights, a flight near 6 miles. virtually every time i fly is 2 miles. you should know where your plane is WITHOUT gps! you should reasonably know how long your battery(s) should last power-on WITHOUT relying on a current meter. Set it to cruise throttle power settings & time how long it runs. Click a stopwatch on the ground when you fly.
Back on the GPS thing. I gave one of my good friends an FPV 2m glider two years ago. He's still yet to loose it. Absolutely raw rc pilot. Had a couple failed flights on a WildHawk, a few minutes of stick time on some of my planes. He navigates with one of the spherical bubble compasses glued way down on the nose. Like this:
http://www.czvanguard.com/UploadFile/2007922151141.gif

Where it really comes in handy is flying from locations you can't navigate back too easily/at all. I won't preach on that as it's part of the fun of FPV & I do it plenty too! #justsayin, if your only way to find your launch/land point is via one system with a dozen failure points... Rethink your flight / train your spider senses harder.

I think it comes down to what you're comfortable with having honestly. I tend to feel like GPS is a luxury since the TBS CORE OSD provides as much info as you'd need. I flew with it maybe 2 flights before deciding that I'd much rather have a GPS and the whole arrow home, distance, altitude, etc on it. I'd never depend on a milage meter nor battery estimate in the googles since realistically you should be timing your flights and setting the timers on your radio or stop watch. I have mine set to 8 minutes being my cutoff with 11 being the absolute minimum when the NAZA low power failsafe kicks in. To be completely honest, 8 minutes is PLENTY of time to FPV.

If I didnt have GPS then I'll admit I likely couldnt find my way back, yes, NSEW means nothing to me when people talk of something being north of here or west.

faber
14th March 2013, 06:01 PM
I recently tried to fly above some very low clouds on an overcast day with my tbs disco. I use 3s 2250 mah batteries and get a solid 7 minutes out of them. After letting it aquire satellite locks I took it straight up as fast as I could. It took a few minutes to reach the bottoms of the clouds and I turned a 360 to orient myself when to my horror I realized the wind had blow me FAR away from my launch position. I began to head back as fast as I could but against the wind i was not making good progress. I flipped over to manual mode and went as fast as I could toward my launch. It was going on 7 1/2 minutes when I began to hear my quad again, and at 8 minutes I was at about 50 feet above my head. my minimal tbs core osd was reading 10.6v and as I landed it was at 10.4. I almost lost my quad because of a few small mistakes. Ever since then I have been looking for an osd that will give me some better info. on my plane I would definitely want at least distance and direction home, voltage and amp draw are nice, but you ought to know your plane pretty well anyway. RTH for oh crap moments would be ideal as well.

Hucker
14th March 2013, 07:12 PM
I'd never depend on a mileage meter nor battery estimate in the goggles since realistically you should be timing your flights and setting the timers on your radio or stop watch. I have mine set to 8 minutes being my cutoff with 11 being the absolute minimum when the NAZA low power failsafe kicks in. To be completely honest, 8 minutes is PLENTY of time to FPV.

For me the primary status indicator of battery state is Volts combined with the current amp draw (throttle position). It takes a little experience but works very well. With this information known the state of the battery regardless of battery history (roughly), load during the flight, or elapsed time can be inferred with good accuracy. A timer by definition must be conservative, which is fine but it leaves flight time on the table.

I tend not to trust amps drawn because you need to know which battery you are flying (batteries look the same), the age of the battery, and how well you charged it.

airtruksrus
15th March 2013, 12:37 AM
It can greatly aid in the recovery of a plane (or multicopter) stuck in the trees in the middle of a forest if it is still transmitting, especially the ezosd that displays the gps coords on the results screen. Once i locked in on the video signal, i could get the location to plug into the handheld garmin and walk right to it with the help of a couple of other fliers. Wouldn't have untreed the plane if it wasn't for their assistance, but ended up finding the plane in about 20 minutes, driving included.

Other than that, makes a great guage on absolute turnaround points as long as you pay attention to the readings.